RESEARCH AT THE CRC FOR LOW CARBON LIVING HAS LED TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF A RANGE OF ON-LINE AND DESKTOP TOOLS FOR PRECINCT ASSESSMENT, ENERGY AND EMISSIONS MODELLING AND MANY OTHER TASKS. TOGETHER THESE MAKE UP AN EXTENSIVE SUITE OF DECISION-SUPPORT AND MODELLING TOOLS THAT CAN ASSIST ALL STAKEHOLDERS WITH DELIVERING A MORE SUSTAINABLE BUILT ENVIRONMENT.

ALL THE CRC TOOLS ARE MADE AVAILABLE FREE OF CHARGE AND IN MOST CASES OPEN-SOURCE.

 

Integrated Carbon metrics

The Integrated Carbon Metrics (ICM) projects built knowledge and tools for both direct and embodied emissions in the building process. Carbon accounting tools that can be scaled to the building, precinct or city level have been developed, to provide a complete picture of the carbon lifecycle in the Australian built environment.

Embodied Carbon Explorer tool

The Embodied Carbon Explorer (ECE) tool rapidly evaluates embodied carbon on a precinct-scale project and shows in detail how different industries contribute to carbon emissions. The ECE is hosted on the Industrial Ecology Virtual Lab and managed from the UNSW.  

Register for an account and to access help and support at https://ielab-aus.info/.

A/Prof Thomas Wiedmann, t.wiedmann@unsw.edu.au

Dr. Soo Huey Teh, soohuey.teh@unsw.edu.au

Precinct Carbon Assessment tool

The Precinct Carbon Assessment (PCA) tool examines the whole life cycle of carbon emissions on a precinct scale and enables the exploration of different low carbon scenarios, calculating their carbon impacts.  

Contact the team at the University of South Australia for access to "light" version at www.precinculators.info or to the full Matlab version.

Dr. Ke Xing, Ke.Xing@unisa.edu.au

Dr. Bin Huang, Bin.Huang@unisa.edu.au

 

 

Transport

Transport is a major emissions contributor.  The 'Greening Urban and Suburban Travel' developed and/or utilised a range of tools for a deep exploration of international best practices and trends in the provision of high-priority, transformative initiatives to tackle the mobility challenges facing suburban communities.

Mobility Modeling tool

This ABM based tool uses the Commuter nanoscopic traffic simulator - as part of the Infraworks 360 Autodesk.Autonomous Mobility On-Demand.  

Visit www.aimsun.com

or contact the team at Swinburne University of Technology for more details:

A/Prof Hussein Dia, HDia@swin.edu.au

Dr. Saeed Bagloee, sasadibagloee@swin.edu.au

Transport Choice tool

The ABM for Transport Mode Choice tool enables the application of a NED (Nudge, Emergence, Diversity) model to the assessment of mode choices. ABM-NED can be applied to a variety of modelling requirements, see www.ned-abm.com.au/ for more information.

Visit www.ned-abm.com.au

or contact the team at CSIROL

Dr. Magnus Moglia, Magnus.Moglia@csiro.au

Stephen Cook, stephen.cook@csiro.au

Transport Modeling tool

The Spatial Network Analysis for Multimodal Urban Transport Systems (SNAMUTS) system is an interactive decision tool designed to assist in examining the performance of a city region’s current public transport network framed around the accessibility of the transport network and accessibility of place. 

Visit www.snamuts.com

or contact the team at Curtin University:

Prof. Carey Curtis, C.Curtis@exchange.curtin.edu.au        

Shared Use Modeling tool

The Precinct Shared Use Mobility Calculator (PSUMC) offers a simple tool for end-users to calculate and review existing levels of carbon emissions in the transport sector within a particular jurisdiction and compare it to future use scenarios.

The tool is an Excel spreadsheet - please contact the team at Swinburne University of Technology for more details:

Damian Moffatt, dmoffatt@swin.edu.au

A/Prof Hussein Dia, HDia@swin.edu.au

 

 

Policy diffusion

Coming up with good policy counts for little if it cannot be effectively disseminated for local impact.  Tools modelling these processes help to ensure more effective outcomes.

Utilising Energy Efficiency Policy Adoption tool

This project consolidated the research across a number of projects into the application of Agent Based Modelling (ABM) into a broader framework known as Nudge, Emergence, Diversity (NED).  ABM-NED was developed in NetLogo and its capabilities and use are described on a website - https://www.ned-abm.com.au/.

Contact the CSIRO team at: Dr. Magnus Moglia, Magnus.Moglia@csiro.au

 

 

Energy options

Several CRCLCL projects developed tools to facilitate the assessment and monitoring of energy supply options in the increasingly complex world of distributed and renewable energy and prosumers.

Financial Assessment tools to assist large energy

Several tools have been developed to assist with the assessment and monitoring of Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs) and to assist large energy consumers with energy contracting and clean energy options including local as well as off-site renewables.  There are also tools for undertaking risk analysis and accessing National Energy Market (NEM) data.  

Visit http://ceem.unsw.edu.au/renewable-ppa-tool for access and information, or contact the team at UNSW:

Dr. Jose Bilbao, j.bilbao@unsw.edu.au

Open source embedded network and microgrid tools

Two open source modelling tools have been developed for (i) embedded networks in multi-unit dwellings and (ii) local mini grids within the distribution network.  

Visit http://ceem.unsw.edu.au/solar-apartments-and-microgrid-models for access and information, or contact the team at UNSW:

Robert Passey, r.passey@unsw.edu.au

 

 

PRECINCT assessment

Program 2 of the CRCLCL's research portfolio was focused on precinct assessment and modelling.  This resulted in the development of several tools to facilitate the complex task of planning at the precinct scale.

ETWW Demand Forecasting

This tool look at integrated forecasting of energy, transport, water and waste (ETWW).  Along with key co-development partner Aecom, the Excel tool was extensively trailed on the Lochiel Park precinct in Adelaide.  Contact the team at the University of South Australia for more details.

Prof. Michael Taylor, Michael.Taylor@unisa.edu.au  

Dr. Nicholas Holyoak, nicholas.holyoak@flinders.edu.au

Precinct Information Model

The Precinct Information Model (PIM) project saw significant inroads made into the persistent challenges posed in integrating Building Information Model (BIM) and Geographical Information System (GIS) approaches to spatial digital representation and modelling.  The project included an integrative approach with BIM and GIS (as well as Lidar and Voxels), applying the combined techniques to the UNSW campus but with a view to wider application in the health and education growth precinct around UNSW and the Prince of Wales hospital.

Visit beyond-bim-and-3dgis for more information or contact the UNSW team:

Prof. Sisi Zlatanova, s.zlatanova@unsw.edu.au

Dr. Jack Barton. jack.barton@unsw.edu.au

Greyfield Precinct Regeneration

This project has focused on activating Greyfield Precinct Regeneration as a viable process for land owners and municipalities to achieve more sustainable housing and land-use outcomes.  Two tools have been developed to aid in precinct assessment - ENVISION and the ENVISION Scenario Planner (ESP).  These have now been actively deployed among five local governments.  

Visit www.greyfieldplanning.com.au for access and information or contact the team at Swinburne University of Technology:

Dr. Stephen Glackin, sglackin@swin.edu.au

 

 

Health co-benefits

Apart from direct benefits for energy and emissions, many initiatives in urban form and sustainable infrastructure promise associated co-benefits for public health outcomes.

Development and trial of Co-benefits calculator

This project has developed a co-benefit calculator suitable for different stakeholders (government regulators, developers, precinct planners and designers, and community end-users) to measure the core health and productivity performance of existing or planned precincts. The tool is openly accessible- contact the team for more help and information.

Visit crcprecintanalyser.com.au

Or contact the team at University of Melbourne: Prof. Mark Stevenson, mark.stevenson@unimelb.edu.au, and Dr. Jason Thompson, jason.thompson@unimelb.edu.au

 

 

Urban Heat Island tools

Urban Heat Islands are emerging as key aspect of climate mitigation in major cities.  CRCLCL projects made a major contribution to research in this area as well as developing several tools.

Urban Heat Island Decision Support tool

The Urban Heat Island Decision Support tool (UHI-DS) provides decision-support for assessing the urban heat implications of development proposals. The tool enables decision makers to determine what the most effective urban design interventions are in reducing air temperature in precinct-scale developments. It has been applied initially to three exemplar precincts (Parramatta, Green Square and Macarthur Heights in Sydney) to assist local governments and developers to effectively mitigate extreme heat conditions.

Mitigation Index & Vulnerability Index tool

The Urban Heat Mitigation Performance Index (UHMPI) supports local governments, developers and urban planners to mitigate extreme heat, complementing, the UHI-DS tool. The UHIMPI provides mitigation strategies and alternatives to support building planning, public realm and community program planning decisions. 

It is also linked to the Urban Heat Vulnerability Index (UHVI), allowing users to query vulnerability the information of a population to support UHI mitigation decision-making. The UHVI was developed using the IPCC methods and comprises three sub-indexes: Exposure, Sensitivity and Adaptive Capacity.

Find the tools at http://uhimitigationindex.be.unsw.edu.au/, or contact the team at UNSW:

 

 

Water

Water processing and recycling is a significant user of energy.  Better tools enable utilities to more effectively assess, manage and improve this aspect of their operations.

Operationalising Australian Energy Benchmarking

This tool employs a novel benchmarking approach to characterise the performance of current recycled water systems in relation to life-cycle cost, energy use and carbon emissions. This led to the development and deployment of an online tool through the Water Services Association of Australia (WSAA).

Contact the team at the University of South Australia for more details:

Dr. Michael Short, Michael.Short@unisa.edu.au

 

 

Brought to you by the Low Carbon Living CRC