04 Jun 2018

Residential and commercial buildings accounted for over 2,000 Million Metric Tons (MMT) of carbon equivalent emissions and 40% of the total energy consumed in the United States in 2016. New construction and major renovations in buildings have a long-term impact on emissions as many of the features incorporated at time of construction will impact energy consumption for decades.

Guide
27 Sep 2018

This report illustrates that adjusting building standards to impact the cities' environment, economy and etc. The standards mentioned here starts from the construction process until the entire lifecycle of the building in Chinese cities. Research support that buildings that are both energy efficient and supplied by clean energy is fundamental in securing a climate-safe future.

Report
25 Sep 2018

Buildings are one of the biggest sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, accounting for over half of total city emissions on average, and a significant source of air pollution. Currently, half a million people die each year due to outdoor air pollution caused by energy used in buildings.

Report
19 Jun 2018

The letter was drafted to gain support AB 2681 on seismic safety for potentially vulnerable buildings from U.S. Green building in California. An example of how building standards could influence public policy/by-law/codes.  

Submission
05 Oct 2017

First adopted in 2007, and most recently renewed in 2015, New Mexico’s Sustainable Building Tax Credit supports the greening of many building types across the state. Released in October, 2017, this case study captures the impacts of this landmark policy and highlights the context and people that helped to create and sustain this nation-leading green building policy.

Policy report
04 Apr 2017

USGBC local communities around the country are helping cities jumpstart their building performance benchmarking efforts. And the results are pretty exciting. After four years of benchmarking in New York City, buildings there are using almost 15 percent less energy according to MIT professor David Hsu, one of the most widely recognized experts in energy benchmarking analysis.

Article
20 Jun 2017

Policies that promote green growth need to be founded on a good understanding of the determinants of green growth and need to be supported with appropriate indicators to monitor progress. This book is an update of the 2014 edition.

Book
09 Mar 2018

The Nationally Determined Contributions are allowing countries to examine options for reducing emissions through a range of domestic policies. India, like many developing countries, has committed to reducing emissions through specific policies, including building energy codes. Here we assess the potential of these sectoral policies to help in achieving mitigation targets.

Journal article
01 May 2016

The primary objective of this research has been to explore retrospectively the impact of implementation of energy building energy codes (EBC), labels, and incentives in reducing space conditioning energy use in buildings in major regions of the world and especially in selected emerging countries.

Report
02 Oct 2018

An abundance of scientific studies points to evidence that indoor environmental quality (IEQ) has a direct effect on health, comfort, wellbeing and productivity. Considering that people spend a large amount of their time indoors, it is crucial that building legislation ensures sufficient levels of IEQ to promote healthy and comfortable indoor environments.

Report
13 Oct 2018

Cities are increasingly taking actions such as building code enforcement, urban planning, and public transit expansion to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide in their communities and municipal operations. However, many cities lack the quantitative information needed to estimate policy impacts and prioritize city actions in terms of carbon abatement potential and cost effectiveness.

Technical report
06 Jan 2018

State-level building energy codes have been around for over 40 years, but recent empirical research has cast doubt on their effectiveness. A potential virtue of standards-based policies is that they may be less regressive than explicit taxes on energy consumption. However, this conjecture has not been tested empirically in the case of building energy codes.

Working paper