16 Jul 2018

Urban trees and woodlands provide a wide range of ecosystem services (ES) to society, for example, flood risk reduction, air purification, and moderation of urban heat islands. Despite this, local government budgets for tree planting and maintenance have declined in many cities throughout the world.

Journal article
01 Oct 2008

Urban areas are usually warmer than their rural surroundings, a phenomenon known as the “heat island effect.” As cities develop, more vegetation is lost and more surfaces are paved or covered with build­ings. The change in ground cover results in less shade and moisture to keep urban areas cool.

Guide
25 Jun 2018

Covering roofs and walls of buildings with vegetation is a good way of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. And these green roofs and walls make cities look nicer. Toronto’s central business district adopted a policy of establishing green roofs on around half of all city buildings in 2009. Research shows this could reduce maximum city temperatures by up to 5℃.

Commentary
01 Apr 2016

A report commissioned by the NSW Architects Registration Board examines "the areas where architects add value to the economy beyond typical construction sector analysis" and defines "where value lies in the work of architects beyond the bricks-and-mortar value of the construction industry." 

Report
01 Jan 2016

This work explores how and where architecture is, can and might help to transform our cities, towns and regions. It explores the social, technological and economic shifts that the sector is exposed to; the policy context in which the sector is positioned; and it offers some thoughts on where fields of growth for the sector may lie.

Discussion paper
01 Jan 2000

This paper begins by examining how economic models have developed over time to define the boundaries of cost and value in building. How value is variously described in other fields is compared, and the technique of value management as a good design tool is analysed.

Book
11 Jan 2018

This report shows how society benefits when buildings can withstand natural disasters.

Report
31 Dec 2015

Heatwaves have a mounted interest in the last decade due to their negative impacts on infrastructure, the ecosystem and public health. Population exposure to heat stress is substantially influenced by the resilience of the built environment as people spend the majority of their time indoors.

Conference paper
06 Oct 2016

Heatwaves have been subject to significant attention in Australia and globally due to their negative impacts on the ecosystem, infrastructure, human health and social life. Measures to increase resilience to heatwaves, however, are mostly isolated in different disciplines.

Journal article
06 Nov 2017

It is an increasing challenge for building designers in the 21st century to provide for thermal comfort at minimum energy cost by taking into consideration both the current and the future warming climate. Most previous studies have focused on thermal comfort in non-residential buildings under current climatic conditions.

Journal article
19 Feb 2019

The Share the Road Programme (launched in 2008 by UN Environment and the FIA Foundation for the Automobile and Society) acts as an advocate for action. This report highlights the best practice of countries around the world to prioritize the needs of pedestrians and cyclists.

Report