12 Sep 2018

Global temperatures are rising. This is especially felt in urban areas due to the urban heat island (UHI) effect, where temperatures can be 10 degrees F (5.5 degrees C) higher than the surrounding countryside. This phenomenon is due to several factors that combine to alter the local microclimate of an urban area.

Blog post
31 Jul 2018

Heatwaves are a critical public health problem. There will be an increase in the frequency and severity of heatwaves under changing climate.

Journal article
01 Feb 2018

As cities grapple with the impacts of heatwaves, exacerbated by the urban heat island effect and progressively amplified by climate change impacts, green spaces can cool urban areas, as well as providing many other functions and benefits to city dwellers’ health and wellbeing, and habitat for urban biodiversity.

Fact sheet
07 Mar 2018

Light, reflective surfaces can have a dramatic impact in cooling the surrounding air – in cities, but in the countryside too. Whitewashed walls, arrays of photovoltaic cells, and stubble-filled fields can all provide local relief during the sweltering decades ahead. But policymakers beware. It doesn’t always work like that.

Article
12 Jul 2018

The world's population is increasingly urban with more than half the global population already living in cities. The urban population is particularly affected by increasing temperatures because of the urban heat island (UHI) effect.

Journal article
01 Jan 2018

Cool roofs and pavements can help cool down buildings and cities. Replacing roofs and pavements with more reflective materials could reverse the urban heat island effect.

Website
01 Oct 2008

Urban areas are usually warmer than their rural surroundings, a phenomenon known as the “heat island effect.” As cities develop, more vegetation is lost and more surfaces are paved or covered with build­ings. The change in ground cover results in less shade and moisture to keep urban areas cool.

Guide
22 Sep 2017

This document presents the mitigation study for the CBD area of Darwin, performed by the High Performance Architecture Group of UNSW, Faculty of Built Environment.

Research report
19 Jun 2018

We're aiming to increase Greater Sydney's tree canopy to 40% by 2030 by planting more trees in streets, parks, bushland areas and yards.
That’s more trees in our streets, parks, backyards, neighbourhoods and schools, so we can grow our tree canopy from 16.8%* to 40% (*source Office of Environment and Heritage, 2011).

Website
01 Mar 2017

Sustainable Sydney 2030 outlined the aspiration of our community and businesses for our local government area to be an environmental leader on a global scale. To guide the implementation of Sustainable Sydney 2030, the City developed a series of environmental master plans and strategies between 2008 and 2015. This strategy and action plan combines the insights and data from these documents.

Strategy
22 Feb 2018

Water's role in liveability: Heat, Waterways and Urban Amenity

Infographic