25 Apr 2017

Green building assessment methods, which play an essential role in promoting the development of greenbuildings, have attracted much attention in recent years. Many studies have been conducted on the development of new assessment methods and improvement of existing ones through comparative analysis. However, there is no comprehensive study that explicitly explores these efforts.

Journal article
21 Sep 2017

It is now established that energy use in buildings is a significant source of global greenhouse gas emissions and that abatement by the building sector can provide significant social, economic and environmental benefits. This paper examines the application of socio-technical transition theory to the building sector with Australian energy policy as a case study.

Journal
01 Dec 2016

In Europe, the latest updates in the directive on the energy performance of buildings introduced two fundamental concepts, namely the cost-optimal energy requirements and the nearly-zero energy buildings (nZEB). Although these concepts are related, the cost-optimal is focused on costs while the nZEB prioritise the energy performance and the use of renewable energy harvested on site.

Journal article
15 Oct 2015

The residential sector represents some 30% of global electricity consumption but the underlying composition and drivers are still only poorly understood. The drivers are many, varied, and complex, including local climate, household demographics, household behaviour, building stock and the type and number of appliances.

Journal article
01 Dec 2015

This paper investigates the use of actual monitored household energy as an indicator of the thermal efficiency of a dwelling and subsequently rating of the building thermal performance.

Journal article
01 May 2016

The rating of buildings using thermal models represents a contrasting regulatory approach to prescriptive measures to improve the energy efficiency of buildings.

Journal article
01 Jan 2018

In Australia, heatwaves are the deadliest natural hazard and a major driver of peak electricity demand. The disproportionately high peak demand increases electricity prices, causes occasional blackouts and exacerbates energy poverty, all of which limit one’s ability to use air conditioning. Meanwhile, increased energy efficiency of dwellings may decrease their heat stress resistance.

Journal article
21 Sep 2017

In times of great transition of the European construction sector to energy efficient and nearly zero energy buildings (nZEB), a market observation containing qualitative and quantitative indications should help to fill out some of the current gaps concerning the EU 2020 carbon targets.

Journal article
16 Feb 2017

    Growth in peak electricity demand poses considerable challenges for utilities seeking to ensure secure, reliable yet affordable energy provision. A better understanding of the key drivers of residential peak electricity demand could assist in better managing peak demand growth through options including demand-side participation and energy efficiency programs.

    Journal article
    07 Aug 2017

    The building sector is the largest contributor to global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Over the years, sound tools have been developed to support the life-cycle assessment of building carbon emissions performance.

    Journal article