15 Oct 2013

Streets are the lifeblood of our communities and the foundation of our urban economies. They make up more than 80 percent of all public space in cities and have the potential to foster business activity, serve as a front yard for residents, and provide a safe place for people to get around, whether on foot, bicycle, car, or transit.

Guide
15 Oct 2017

This Blueprint outlines a vision for cities in a future where automated transportation is both accepted and widespread as part of the built environment. It is a human-centered vision for the potential of city streets, intersections, and networks-one in which automation is harnessed to serve the goals of safety, equity, public health, and sustainability.

Guide
01 Jan 2017

This paper discusses the significance of urban rail in sustainable development through a number of case studies.

Journal article
28 Jun 2019

It has been calculated that cement production is responsible for about six percent of total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and, while considerable effort has been undertaken by Australian industry to reduce emissions due to the energy input, which is considerable, process emissions represent about 56 per cent of the total. To date, schemes such as carbon-capture-storage-utilisation have yet to make significant inroads into reducing the release of these process emissions with environmentally harmful gasses released to the atmosphere.

Report
05 Jan 2016

Global warming poses particular challenges for urban areas due to the greater intensity of rainfall and issues of stormwater runoff, and the heat island effect generated by the reflection of the sun off hard surfaces, such as buildings and road pavements; for example, in Australian cities (i.e., Sydney), roads account for approximately 25% of all urban land use. The challenge for road authorities is to implement green infrastructure in road planning, design and implementation as the term “green infrastructure” has appeared increasingly throughout the world in land management and planning.

Journal article
24 May 2018

This report discusses how to manage growing competition for curb access in cities. The rise of ride services and the growth in urban goods delivery are challenging traditional ways of managing curb space. We describe how curb use is changing, how our capacity to monitor its use may need to evolve and discuss what the future of the curb may look like. We explore the implications of a large-scale uptake of ridesharing services and other innovative mobility options in urban settings for street design and pricing.

Policy report
11 Jul 2018

Technological developments will bring changes large and small to urban transport infrastructure over the coming decades, but the most widely felt impacts will be on the humble, low tech footpath. Read the full article on Foreground

Article
01 Oct 2008

Urban areas are usually warmer than their rural surroundings, a phenomenon known as the “heat island effect.” As cities develop, more vegetation is lost and more surfaces are paved or covered with build­ings. The change in ground cover results in less shade and moisture to keep urban areas cool. Built-up areas also evaporate less water, which contributes to elevated surface and air temperatures.

Guide
28 Jun 2018

Two years after launching the award-winning Cool Streets project in Sydney’s Blacktown, Libby Gallagher remains a staunch advocate for the role that street trees play in mitigating the impacts of climate change and making better cities.
Read the full article at Foreground

Article
01 Jan 2005

Governments, planners and analysts across Australia agree that mode shift from the automobile to walking, cycling and public transport is desirable for environmental, social and health reasons, but in all our major cities trends are heading in the opposite direction. Various remedies have been proposed, but all have their drawbacks. Road pricing, for example, is widely supported by transport planners, but is extremely unpopular with the public.

Conference paper
01 May 2018

Future Street was a public activation, demonstrating the design concepts and technology for our future public spaces. Transforming a prominent Sydney street and reclaiming it for the people of the city, Future Street sparked ideas about how these spaces could be different and what that means for the community.

Briefing paper
01 Feb 2018

This report provides an in-depth analysis of the costs and benefits of applying a set of smart surface solutions1 , including cool roofs, green roofs, solar PV, and permeable and reflective pavements and road surfaces across three cities: El Paso, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. The report demonstrates that cities can strengthen resilience, improve health and comfort, expand jobs and slow global warming through smart surface strategies while securing billions of dollars in net financial benefits.

Report