24 Sep 2015

Low carbon community programs that encourage citizens to reduce their carbon emissions have been subject to various government and civil society trials in recent years. Behaviour change programs using ‘social marketing’ techniques have had mixed success in community carbon reduction because of a focus on individual control and lack of systemic context.

Conference paper
24 Feb 2019

Urban areas are responsible for 70% of global CO2 emissions and the rapid growth in urbanisation presents a significant risk to cities. It is predicted that by 2030 more than 70% of the South African population will be living in cities. The decarbonisation of urban systems, especially building and energy infrastructures are therefore strategically important in mitigating climate change.

Thesis
11 Dec 2018

This document provides a holistic and integrated sustainable development framework for the development of liveable, economically productive, socially inclusive and environmentally sustainable cities and communities in China. The framework identifies key objectives and principles to achieve urban sustainability and provides specific guidelines for implementation and performance assessment.

Guide
13 Jul 2018

Recent scholarly attention shows that grassroots civil society low-carbon energy initiatives increasingly become part of the subnational climate change governance landscape. Despite their potency in view of consumer-owned distributed generation and enhanced citizen influence in the organization of the energy infrastructure, local low-carbon energy initiatives (LLCEIs) struggle to become viable alternatives to the centralized, private oriented energy system.

Journal article
04 Apr 2017

USGBC local communities around the country are helping cities jumpstart their building performance benchmarking efforts. And the results are pretty exciting. After four years of benchmarking in New York City, buildings there are using almost 15 percent less energy according to MIT professor David Hsu, one of the most widely recognized experts in energy benchmarking analysis. Learn more in this Benchmarking in Cities brief.

Article
06 Sep 2018

Community Development Block Grants – Disaster Relief, or CDBG-DR, are allocated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to affected states and local governments to aid long-term recovery of community infrastructure following major disasters. This injection of funding is an opportunity for communities to rebuild stronger, smarter, and more resilient – and LEED offers trusted third-party verification to help validate these efforts.

Policy
09 Jul 2018

With the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, Member States agreed on 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with 169 global targets, and nearly 234 indicators that will be monitored for the period 2015–2030. The targets are designed to be integrated and indivisible and to balance the social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainable development. The 2030 Agenda further seeks to realize the human rights of all, and to achieve gender equality and empowerment of all women and girls.

Report
18 Jun 2006

The cost of bad design is a clarion call. There is no excuse for bad design, and no reason to accept poor standards, yet exemplary buildings remain the exception. The buildings and spaces being constructed now will shape the way our towns and cities function over the next 50 years. We must ensure we create a legacy in the next 10 years of which we can be proud.

Essay
12 May 2017

This study results show that the Walkability PSS could support planners in several situations including testing and comparing planning scenarios for greenfield and brownfield areas, conducting consultation and/or workshops with various stakeholders and making decisions about the provision of new infrastructure.

Chapter
14 Jul 2017

This Zero Carbon Communities guide is for community groups and councils who want to see rapid local progress towards zero emission targets.

Guide
01 Nov 2013

Social sustainability is about ensuring the sustenance of the diverse social relations that exist in healthy communities. Creating the physical, cultural and social places that support wellbeing and a sense of community involves a process of engagement with the people who inhabit those places. There are several key points to note: social sustainability is as much about the process as it is about the outcome, the design of the physical place is critical and the physical outcomes need to be integrated with social infrastructure systems. The note is divided into two parts.

Discussion paper