13 Apr 2018

Level(s) provides a unique opportunity for the building sector to focus on the potential of buildings in addressing global challenges. By linking the building’s individual performance to key global and regional priorities, it is assured that buildings designed using the Level(s) framework are realising their full potential in addressing issues such as climate change, environment and health.

Report
22 Nov 2017

Level(s) is a voluntary reporting framework to assess the sustainability of buildings. Using existing standards, Level(s) provides a common EU approach to the assessment of environmental performance in the built environment.

Report
23 Dec 2015

This working paper brings together the findings of the first stage in this study, which focusses on the identification of 'macro-objectives' for the environmental performance of the EU building stock. This stage is intended to provide an initial 'top down' view of what the strategic priorities (the 'macro-objectives') should be for the building sector.

Working paper
23 Dec 2015

This study focused on analysing on-the-ground compliance with the current national regulatory frameworks across the EU-28 concerning the energy performance of buildings.

Report
27 Jun 2016

Prof Owen Lewis, Emeritus Professor of Architectural Science, UCD Dublin, and chair of the Irish Green Building Council. Prof Lewis discuss the benefits of building energy efficiency

Video
29 Nov 2016

Buildings can balance the grid through proactive energy demand management and can play a leading role in transforming the EU energy market, shifting from centralised, fossil-fuel-based systems towards a decentralised, renewable, interconnected and variable system. Many actors agree that buildings have a role in shaping the Energy Market Design Initiative.

Discussion paper
30 Mar 2017

The rationale for energy efficiency policy can be framed in terms of a variety of different benefits. This paper considers how different benefits have been used within the overall rationale for energy efficient retrofit policy in different contexts.

Journal article
01 Jun 2017

As the largest energy consumer in the world, energy efficiency and conservation have been prioritized in China to meet its fast-growing appetite for energy as a result of industrialization and urbanization, as well as to alleviate environmental pressure and tackle climate change.

Book
12 Jan 2016

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a leading organization globally on building energy codes and standards. PNNL has served as the technical lead for DOE’s Building Energy Codes Program in the U.S. and worked on building energy codes in many countries including Vietnam, India, China, and Russia.

Presentation
12 Jan 2016

Buildings currently account for over 35% of Vietnam’s total energy consumption. Buildings codes could result in 30-40% buildings energy savings. The Vietnam Building Energy Code (VBEEC) was introduced in 2013 and now scheduled for revision in 2016.

Presentation
23 Oct 2018

Da Nang is a major harbor city and the largest urban centre in central Vietnam. In 2010, the city used roughly 17.9 petajoules of energy in various forms. Lack of local fossil fuel resources results in 100 percent reliance of Da Nang on energy imports. While notable solar energy potential and local wind resources are present, their utilisation has not yet started in the city.

Report
23 Oct 2018

In the past two decades, Vietnam has been experiencing rapid economic growth, with GDP growing by 6.8 percent in 2017. Economic growth has resulted in significant improvement in the quality of the people’s lives and poverty reduction. In 2015, Vietnam became a net energy importer with an import share of energy at 5%, which is expected to grow.

Report