07 Sep 2018

This study describes the results of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) applied to 24 statistically-based dwelling archetypes, representative of the EU housing stock in 2010. The aim is to quantify the average environmental impacts related to housing in Europe and to define reference values (baseline scenario) for policies development.

Journal article
16 Aug 2016

14% of Australians live in apartments, predominantly in urban centres, yet few of these have PV systems, despite high levels of PV deployment on separate and semi-detached residential buildings.

Conference paper
28 Jul 2017

Buildings are responsible for a large share of the global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions generation. Most emissions are produced during the operation of the buildings.

Chapter
05 Jul 2016

This paper examines the optimisation of a PV/T air collector with a fixed length and width (L=5 m, W= 3.6 m) linked to the mechanical air distribution system of a typical residential building.

Journal article
23 May 2017

Sustainability assessment tools aim to promote high sustainability outcomes in residential buildings, ensuring less consumption of water, energy and less emission of greenhouse gases. However, existing literature often presents variations between the estimated outcomes from the assessment tools and actual outcomes after building occupation.

Journal article
28 Dec 2018

Modern residential building energy codes provide a component tradeoff mechanism by which builders can trade reductions in the efficiency of some building components in trade for corresponding improvement in other components. One common tradeoff approach is based on maintaining a building "UA value," which represents the building envelope's overall thermal conductance.

Technical report
28 Dec 2018

Heat recovery ventilators (HRVs) save energy by recovering heat that would otherwise be exhausted as part of energy code-mandated mechanical ventilation systems. Residential HRVs can be life cycle cost effective depending on equipment/installation costs and the severity of the climate.

Technical report
18 Apr 2017

Building energy codes lay out the minimum requirements for the envelope (insulation, windows and air sealing), mechanical equipment and lighting of a building (residential and commercial) in terms of energy efficiency/conservation for new construction or major renovations.

Presentation
05 Aug 2016

In 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a FOA (Funding Opportunity Announcement) to conduct residential energy code field studies using a radically different methodology from previous studies. Historically, studies defined and measured “compliance” as the portion of all code requirements being met on a house-by-house basis.

Conference paper
05 Aug 2016

The energy benefits of increased code compliance have generally been viewed through the lens of energy savings – kWh and therms. Peak demand reduction as an additional benefit of increased code compliance is a comparatively unexplored area – despite a general acknowledgement that there are electric demand savings (kW) associated with increased energy code compliance.

Conference paper
05 Aug 2016

Improvements in building energy codes cannot be fully realized unless targeted stakeholder education, training and outreach is provided to support increased understanding of and compliance with the minimum requirements.

Conference paper
05 Aug 2016

In 2009 the Washington State Legislature updated the legislation authorizing the Washington State Energy Code (WSEC). In the process, the legislature also set a goal that the total energy of new buildings would be reduced 70% over the performance of buildings built to the 2006 WSEC by the 2031 code cycle.

Conference paper