25 Nov 2016

Solar heating and cooling (SHC) systems are currently under rapid development and deployment due to their potential to reduce the use of fossil fuel resources and to alleviate greenhouse gas emissions in the building sector – a sector which is responsible for ~40% of the world energy use. Absorption chiller technology (traditionally powered by natural gas in large buildings), can easily be retrofitted to run on solar energy. However, numerous non-intuitive design choices must be analyzed to achieve the best techno-economic performance of these systems.

Journal article
01 Oct 2015

Solar-assisted cooling technology has enormous potential for air-conditioning applications since both solar energy supply and cooling energy demand are well correlated. Unfortunately, market uptake of solar cooling technologies has been slow due to the high capital cost and limited design/operational experience. In the present work, different designs and operational modes for solar heating and cooling (SHC) absorption chiller systems are investigated and compared in order to identify the preferred design strategies for these systems.

Journal article
19 Feb 2016

The present work investigates the feasibility of solar heating and cooling (SHC) absorption systems based on combining three types of LiBr-H2O absorption chillers (single-, double-, and triple-effect) with common solar thermal collectors available on the market. A single-effect chiller is coupled with evacuated tube collectors (ETCs) – SHC1. A double-effect chiller is integrated with parabolic trough collectors (PTCs), linear Fresnel micro-concentrating collectors (MCTs) and evacuated flat plate collectors (EFPCs) respectively – SHC2, SHC3, and SHC4.

Journal article
21 Sep 2015

This paper presents energetic, economic, and environmental (3E) analyses of four configurations of solar heating and cooling (SHC) systems based on coupling evacuated tube collectors with a single-effect LiBre-H2O absorption chiller. In the first configuration (SHC1), a gas-fired heater is used as the back-up system, while a mechanical compression chiller is employed as the auxiliary cooling system in the second configuration (SHC2). The capacity of the absorption chiller is designed based on the maximum building cooling load in these configurations.

Journal article
06 Sep 2016

In this paper, a detailed simulation model of a solar-powered triple-effect LiBr–H2O absorption chiller is developed to supply both cooling and heating demand of a large-scale building, aiming to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in building sector. TRNSYS 17 is used to simulate the performance of the system over a typical year. A combined energetic-economic-environmental analysis is conducted to determine the system annual primary energy consumption and the total cost, which are considered as two conflicting objectives.

Journal article
29 May 2018

Solar heating and cooling (SHC) systems are currently under rapid development and deployment due to their potential to reduce fossil fuel use and to alleviate greenhouse gas emissions in the building sector – a sector which is responsible for ∼40% of the world energy use. The available technologies on the market for thermally driven cooling systems are absorption and adsorption chillers, solid and liquid desiccant cooling systems, and ejector refrigeration cycles.

Literature review
29 Jul 2016

The feasibility of solar-powered multi-effect LiBr-H2O absorption chillers is investigated under different climate conditions, and three configurations of solar absorption chillers are proposed with respect to the type of the chiller. In the first configuration, a single-effect absorption chiller is coupled with evacuated tube collectors (ETCs), while parabolic trough collectors (PTCs) are utilized to run double- and triple-effect LiBr-H2O chillers in the second and third configurations, respectively. A simulation model for each configuration is developed in TRNSYS 17 environment.

Journal article
09 Feb 2015

High-temperature absorption chillers (double-effect and triple-effect) have a higher coefficient of performance (COP) than single-effect chillers. This can reduce the collector’s footprint and cost in a solar-cooling plant. Though single-effect, absorption chiller-based solar-cooling systems have been studied for the past 20 years, very little information is available on the performance benefits of high-temperature solar-cooling systems.

Conference paper
22 Apr 2017

This study compares the cost of operating the auxiliary components of an optimised standalone hot water fired absorption chiller, using mains grid electricity and an optimised standalone photovoltaic system. The cheaper source was further compared with using mains electricity to operate a conventional reverse cycle air-air heat pump. Both types of air conditioners were sized to condition the same typical Australian house in three different Australian climate zones.

Conference paper
29 Jul 2016

The increased penetration of residential air-conditioners (AC); specifically vapor compression types, is regarded as one of the foremost causes of a dramatic rise in critical peak electricity demands requiring corresponding upgrades of electricity infrastructures. These upgrades requires heavy investments, consequently, driving up electricity prices. Solar air-conditioning systems can reduce this trend, but current vapor-compression air-conditioners (VCACs) needs very large investments in both photovoltaic system and battery storage.

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